A Room With A Large Mirror
A Group Of Men Sitting At A Table
Booking Details Provenance Hotels Booking Logo

Rooms

01

Adults

01

Children

01

Located in downtown Tacoma, the epicenter of the American glass art scene, Hotel Murano is home a curated collection of renowned art. The hotel is named after Murano, Italy – an island off the coast of Venice that has long been home to generations of glassblowers and is famed as the Old World capital of glass art.

In celebration of the Pacific Northwest’s central role in the modern glass art movement, we’ve carefully curated an international collection of 20th-century works in glass that mixes site-specific commissioned pieces with acquisitions from artists’ studios and galleries around the world. Forty-five artists from twelve countries are represented, showcasing an incredible diversity of glass art techniques and styles.

Continue reading for a glimpse into the one-of-its-kind glass art collection at Hotel Murano.

AKHENATON Randal, Seth. Pate de verre, 2002.

Randal is an American artist drawing inspiration from the ancient worlds of Egypt, Greece, and Rome. He follows the centuries-old Platonic principle that speaks to beauty as an inherent part of an object, not something bestowed on it by the viewer: for Plato, and Randal, beauty can never be separated from the object it possesses.

In his own words, “I am hoping to initiate an interactive experience, to encourage each person to delve into their imagination and write their own story.”

Akhenaton can be found in the guestroom tower on the 8th floor.

HAPPILY EVER AFTER Glasgow, Taylor. Fused, sewn glass, 2006.

Taylor Glasgow’s mother told her she should always act like a lady, and, as men appreciated it, she must learn to cook and sew. Today, Glasgow says her misguided domestic talents grew into concepts of sewing an unyielding medium, baking inedible creations, and stitching glass clothing no one can wear. For many years, she thought her art was about herself, but she realized that it is mostly about her mother and the domesticated feminine ideals she passed on. Glasgow’s work embraces these ideals but in a contrary material, which offers conflicting messages of comfort and expectation.

Happily Ever After can be found in the guestroom tower on the 15th floor.

TRIO Marioni, Dante. Blown glass, 2006.

In the artist’s own words, “I started blowing glass and discovered that I liked tall and thin forms, and my pieces have gradually gotten that way. When I make drawings, that’s the way they come out: tall and thin. It can take me several years before I am able to make what I have drawn. My eye has evolved too. Looking at slides of my earlier work, I remember at the time I thought my vessels were perfect. Now I look at this work and I see that I am much better today at what I do.”

Trio can be found in the guestroom tower on the 14th floor.

CHANDELIER Micheluzzi, Massimo. Blown and mirrored glass, 2007.

Born into a family that had owned glass and antique galleries for generations, it was only natural for Micheluzzi to be interested in glass. He was also fortunate to have the tutelage of two scions of the best-known art glass families of Venice, Laura de Santillana and the great Archimede Seguso. The chandelier at the Murano is the largest piece he has created. Micheluzzi uses traditional techniques to achieve a uniquely modern aesthetic.

Chandlier can be found in the main atrium.

BOWLED OVER Perkins, Flo. Blown glass, 2006

Perkins imbues her bowling balls and pins with unexpected emotion and a light-hearted surrealism. The forms may appear simple, but the blowing technique has taken eight years of experimentation. Perkins follows her intuition and has crafted a uniquely recognized personal iconography and style.

In the artist’s own words, “Not knowing where my work will lead enriches the mystery of the creative process and keeps me honest!”

Bowled Over can be found in the guestroom tower on the 16th floor.

The Viking Boats Skov, Vibeke. Kiln formed, slumped, fused, coldworked glass, 2007.

Three Viking Boats were commissioned by the hotel to adorn the atrium above the ballroom corridor from Danish artist, Vibeke Skov. The largest “Boat of the Gods” depicts the myths of the Viking gods; the medium-sized “Boat of the Goddesses” features 50 or so panels of Nordic goddess myths; the smallest “Creation Boat” depicts the destruction of the Nordic gods and the birth of Christianity.

In the artist’s own words, “I find inspiration in mythology, fantasy and dreams, and when I make bigger things like the Viking Boats, I need the stories to hold it all together.”

The Viking Boats can be found suspended in the lower level atrium.

The Viking Boats Skov, Vibeke. Kiln formed, slumped, fused, coldworked glass, 2007.

Three Viking Boats were commissioned by the hotel to adorn the atrium above the ballroom corridor from Danish artist, Vibeke Skov. The largest “Boat of the Gods” depicts the myths of the Viking gods; the medium-sized “Boat of the Goddesses” features 50 or so panels of Nordic goddess myths; the smallest “Creation Boat” depicts the destruction of the Nordic gods and the birth of Christianity.

In the artist’s own words, “I find inspiration in mythology, fantasy and dreams, and when I make bigger things like the Viking Boats, I need the stories to hold it all together.”

The Viking Boats can be found suspended in the lower level atrium.

ICEBERG Bremers, Peter. Cast glass, 2007.

Dutch artist Peter Bremers draws his inspiration for Iceberg from the wonders of the natural world. In his own words, “I can only say that, for me, the overwhelming emotion was my sense of insignificance in the face of the savage energy of the oceans and of the delight at the sight of yet another majestic sunrise over a flawless snow-covered landscape. How can I express my gratitude for this inexhaustible source of inspiration other than by trying to depict the awesome power and majesty of nature in my sculpture? Not aiming to imitate or equal it, but simply to express my sense of wonder as a human being and an artist.”

Iceberg can be found in the guestroom tower on the 24th floor.

FISH HANGER #49 Yamano, Hiroshi. Blown, hot sculpted glass, 2005.

Japanese glass artist Hiroshi Yamano has long identified with fish swimming the oceans as he so often traverses the vast waters between continents of his own life. His Nagare (a Japanese word meaning current) pieces are designed to be slightly askew, creating a sense of movement, or flow, in the work. They are an extension of his popular From East to West series, through which he explores the influence of both Eastern and Western cultures in his life.

In the artist’s own words, “I am a fish who is always looking for something. I am a fish who cannot stop swimming until by body stops moving. Maybe I’ll swim together, like the universe.”

Fish Hanger #49 can be found in the guestroom tower on the 23rd floor.

A Sign On The Side Of A Building

As you approach the hotel, you’re greeted by Orizon, a monumental, 75-foot-tall curved steel and plate glass site specific sculpture that was commissioned for the hotel and designed for the site by famed Greek glass artist, Costas Varotsos. Inside the lobby, gaze upwards and you’ll find, suspended above the Grand Corridor, three giant Viking boats created by Danish artist Vibeke Skov from stained glass that depicts the Norse creation myths.

From there, continue your artistic journey through our lobby with works by American glass art icon Dale Chihuly, Massimo Micheluzzi’s blown-and-silvered sea anemone-like chandelier, and Karen LaMonte’s Pianist’s Dress, a life-sized, floor-length gown made of cast glass.

On every guest room floor, you’ll discover a glass sculpture accompanied by an illuminated panel highlighting the artist who brought the work to life. Photos and drawings illustrate the process behind the creation of that piece of art.

Docent-led tours of The Collection can be arranged to guests and non-guests. Tours need to be booked in advance and there is a $5/person fee. To schedule a tour, contact us at info@hotelmuranottacoma.com.

Artist in Residence Program

Check out our new Artist in Residence program offering short-term, week-long stays for accepted creators on a rolling basis all year round across our collection from Boston and New Orleans to Seattle and Portland. Learn more and apply for the Artist in Residence program here.